If you were born between the years 1944 and 1964, also known as the Baby Boomer Generation, your nutrition should differ significantly from others. Increased protein, fiber, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D could extend your years and improve your quality of life. What’s more, age-related diseases like osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and adult-onset diabetes are also on the rise (in the millions) in older adults. It is critical, now, more than ever, for Baby Boomers to take their health seriously. Here’s the breakdown of what you need to know.

If you were born between the years 1944 and 1964, also known as the Baby Boomer Generation, your nutrition should differ significantly from others. Increased protein, fiber, vitamin B12, calcium, and vitamin D could extend your years and improve your quality of life. What’s more, age-related diseases like osteoporosis, sarcopenia, and adult-onset diabetes are also on the rise (in the millions) in older adults. It is critical, now, more than ever, for Baby Boomers to take their health seriously. Here’s the breakdown of what you need to know.

Increase Protein, Maintain More Muscle 

According to the National Institute of Health, protein requirements stay the same into older adulthood.1 However, as we get older, we naturally begin to lose muscle mass and strength, a condition known as sarcopenia. Sarcopenia can develop as early as your 40s from poor diet and lack of exercise.2,3

The current recommendations for protein for older adults are 0.8g of protein per kilogram of body weight. That means that the average 150-pound person needs 55g of protein per day (the equivalent of two chicken breasts). However, studies show that consuming protein in slightly higher amounts than this recommendation may help preserve muscle and bone mass.4 It’s for this reason that Baby Boomers should consider aiming for slightly more protein (1.0-1.2g/kg). Focus on lean sources of protein including fish, eggs, beans, lentils, and tofu to meet your needs.

You can further maintain muscle mass through strength training. Exercise serves as a critical factor for maintaining muscle strength and physical independence in the older population.

 

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